<span class="gmail_quote">On 8/17/07, <b class="gmail_sendername">Philipp ‹berbacher</b> &lt;<a href="mailto:hollunder@gmx.at">hollunder@gmx.at</a>&gt; wrote:</span><br>
<div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;"><br>I don&#39;t know what you mean by deprecated libraries and stuff,<br>everything except I think 2-3 apps is the same as in feisty, so if
<br>anything &#39;deprecated&#39; is there it is in feisty.<br>Sure, some stuff could have been better, but I&#39;m glad that it worked as<br>well as it did.<br><br>
</blockquote></div>
<br>
That&#39;s something that I keep debating about. The &quot;slow upgrade, but
stable&quot; model of Debian seems to go against the so fast development of
Linux audio apps. Releases occur often and with good improvements so
freezing versions &quot;Debian style&quot; makes you have to deal with bugs for
long time, unless you build your own apps which sometimes is not easy
to do (specially when the core libraries change too). I guess this model was
and is successful for other applications like servers. That&#39;s what I
don&#39;t like about Ubuntu Studio, you have to wait 6 months to get to use
3 or 5 versions ahead of Ardour, for example. Also they don&#39;t want to
include any other app that is not authorized by the official repository
and it seems that including specialized audio apps is not their first
priority (PD-extended or Csound5 for example). Fedora works fine from
that point of view since updates happen quite often and Fernando keeps
up very good with Planet CCRMA and the new versions.<br>
<br>
Just my personal opinion.<br>
<br>Cheers!<br>
<br>
Hector<br>
<br>&nbsp;
<br>